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VACCINATION SERVICES AND RESOURCES

Cats

FVRCP Vaccination

Protects kittens and adults against several infectious diseases.

Vaccinate at 8, 12 and 16 weeks of age for injectable vaccine. Booster in 1 year. Then may give every 1-3 years

FVR = Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis 

Herpes viral infection that may cause fever, loss of appetite, depression, eye or respiratory disease. The disease is highly contagious and may be fatal.

C = Calici

A viral infection that may cause fever, loss of appetite, depression, ulcers, arthritis, and mild to moderate eye and respiratory disease. The disease may be fatal.

P = Panleukopenia (a.k.a. Distemper, Parvo)

A viral infection that may cause fever, loss of appetite, depression, abortion, immune suppression, and gastrointestinal disease in adults, and neurologic disease in
kittens. The disease is often fatal.

Rabies Vaccination

Protects kittens and adults against disease transmitted between wild animals, domestic animals and humans. The disease causes severe neurologic disease, which is often fatal. Animals suspected of having the disease may be killed according to state law.

Vaccinate at 12 to 16 weeks. Booster annually for PureVax Rabies vaccine.

Feline Leukemia Vaccination

Protects kittens and adults against infection transmitted between cats through saliva (mutual grooming, shared water source and/or bite wounds). The disease may cause anemia, abortion, cancer, severe immune suppression (resulting in several types of secondary infections), gastrointestinal, respiratory, neurologic and/or kidney disease. The disease is eventually fatal.

Vaccinate at 12 and 16 weeks. Booster annually for the first five years.

Dogs

DHPP Vaccination

Protects puppies and adults against several infectious diseases.

D = Distemper

A viral infection that may cause fever, vomiting, diarrhea, respiratory and/or neurologic disease. The disease may be fatal.

H = Hepatitis

A viral infection that may cause fever or low body temperature, immune suppression, vomiting, diarrhea, respiratory, liver and/or neurologic disease. The disease may be fatal.

P = Parvo 

A viral infection that may cause fever, immune system suppression, vomiting, diarrhea and/or heart disease. The disease may be fatal.

P = Parainfluenza 

A viral infection that may cause fever and transient respiratory disease. The disease is rarely fatal.

Vaccinate at 8, 12 and 16 weeks of age. Booster in 1 year. Then may booster every 1-3 years.

Leptospirosis Vaccination

A relatively new vaccine produced by Fort Dodge. It is the only vaccine currently available that is able to protect dogs against 4 of the 5 most common types of Leptospirosis found in Wisconsin. This vaccine protects against disease transmitted by rodents, squirrels, skunks, raccoons, opossums, pigs and dogs. The disease may cause kidney and/or liver disease, and may be fatal.

Vaccinate at 8 and 12 weeks of age. Booster annually.

Lyme Vaccination -  Protects puppies and adults against disease transmitted by ticks. The disease may cause fever, lameness, arthritis, heart, neurologic and/or kidney disease. The disease is rarely fatal.

Vaccinate at 12 and 16 weeks (may be most effective when given prior to 6 to 7 months of age) Booster annually.

Rabies Vaccination -  Protects puppies and adults against disease transmitted between wild animals, domestic animals and humans. The disease causes severe neurologic disease, which is fatal. Animals suspected of having the disease may be killed according to the law.

Vaccinate at 12 to 16 weeks. Booster in 1 year. Then booster every 3 years.

Bordetella Vaccination

Also known as Kennel Cough, is a bacterial infection that may cause respiratory disease. The disease may be fatal. Vaccination recommended for training classes, boarding kennels, doggy daycare, and dog shows. Given at any age.

Booster every 6 to 12 months, as directed by your veterinarian.

Current Topics in Vaccinations...

Recently, the topic of vaccination protocols has been in the spotlight. Researchers at some of the major Universities, including Wisconsin, Colorado, Texas A & M, and Cornell, have been investigating the long-term effectiveness of common vaccinations given to our companion animals. The issues they are trying to address are as follows:

1. The duration of effective immunity or protection (i.e. the amount of time in years that the vaccine will protect the patient) after the initial vaccination series is given.

2. The effect of repeated vaccination on the immune system, and the correlation between vaccination and immune mediated diseases.

3. The effects of systemic vaccination reactions (vomiting, diarrhea, stiffness, and anaphylactic/allergic reactions).

4. The effect of local vaccination reactions, and the development of localized skin cancer in cats ("feline sarcoma").

Duration of effective immunity...

Some interesting research in cats and dogs indicates that certain vaccinations may actually protect the patient for years. The question regarding lifelong protection is also under investigation. This would parallel human vaccination programs, where most vaccinations given to children do not need to be boosted every year.

It is important to note that Bacterins (i.e. vaccination for bacterial diseases, such as Leptospirosis and Bordetella in dogs) do not provide long-term protection. There is debate as to whether they even protect for a year. In addition, it is important to note that the same type of vaccine produced by the various drug companies are not created equal; therefore, they do not necessarily offer equal protection.

Immune mediated diseases..

The concern for vaccinations actually contributing to the development of immune mediated disease is a very real concern. Because a variety of factors can cause disease, this is a difficult topic to research. However, there does seem to be a correlation in certain patients between recent vaccination and development of certain immune mediated diseases.

Vaccination reactions...

Dogs and cats may exhibit various signs of vaccination reaction. While some reactions are considered to be "mild", some allergic reactions can be life threatening.
If vaccinations are causing transient illness in our pets, we need to evaluate how often we should vaccinate.

Feline sarcomas...

Vaccinations were modified in 1985 to allow veterinarians to give the vaccination under the skin instead of in the muscle. This route of vaccination is much more comfortable for the pet. However, it is believed that these "improved" vaccinations contain a certain substance or substances that cause inflammatory reactions when given repeatedly under the skin. In certain populations of cats, these inflammatory reactions may actually cause cancerous changes.

These changes may occur within a few months to a few years after vaccination. While some areas report a 1:10,000 incidence, others report a 1:1,000 incidence. These numbers mean nothing to the actual cat that develops cancer..... While we are trying to prevent severe, and often deadly viral diseases with vaccination, there appears to be some risk with the vaccination itself. At this time, we have not found any link between vaccination and skin cancer in dogs.

Final comments...

Since the research is still pending, there are no set rules for vaccination. It will be several years before we can make valid statements regarding vaccination protocols. We have presented the topics of concern and the recommendations made by several Universities and veterinarians.

If you are not comfortable with changing the frequency in which your pet is vaccinated, it is perfectly acceptable to continue with annual vaccination. As a matter of fact, any female dog or cat used for breeding should be vaccinated annually for the sake of passive immunity to the newborns. Regardless of which vaccination
program you choose to follow, Waupaca Small Animal Hospital will only use the brands of vaccines recommended by the University of Wisconsin, School of Veterinary Medicine.

We hope to raise your awareness of these topics and to stimulate questions and discussion. We will carefully review your pet's needs to make the best recommendations for your pet.